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Quality of Life. The Heart of the Matter. - 06/02/2006
 
An international conference at the Royal Society, London, from 13th to 15th September 2006, organized by the Universities' Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) and the British Veterinary Association (BVA). An abstract follows of VEGA's contribution to the program.
An international conference at the Royal Society, London, from 13th to 15th September 2006, organized by the Universities' Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) and the British Veterinary Association (BVA). An abstract follows of VEGA's contribution to the program.



WHAT PRICE ANIMAL WELFARE IN FARMING POLICIES AND TRENDS IN FOOD PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION? THE CASE FOR DEMONSTRATIVE BOYCOTTING


A Long, AE Karlsson

VEGA Research, UK



Reduction, Refinement, and Replacement – the 3R’s – are the earnests in official policies and example in good practice to reduce the toll of suffering in experiments on animals. They are policies also that the pharmaceutical industry and doctors claim to espouse.

What, then, can animal welfarists and veterinarians do to alleviate the much greater toll in the animals enslaved in the workings of the live/deadstock industry, from which consumers can extricate themselves from complicity with much less embarrassment than abstention from developments in the biological sciences and of therapeutics derived therefrom?

Lessons will be drawn from the repercussions of BSE and foot-and-mouth disease and of earlier and viral zoonoses and from the prospects of intensified exploitation in the human greed imbuing cheap food policies.

This relentlessness can be staunched and reversed only by well-informed and vigorous consumer power at the check-out, led by professed animal welfarists (and rightists) exercising and demonstrating the FAWC’s Five Freedoms in the developments of bold alternatives from the farming and food industries (in harmony with the Food Standards Agency’s purports). Public and trade need to be impressed by scientists doing much more than compiling litanies of persistent woes and preaching questionable free ranging palliatives. If the scientists’ evidence is inadequate to prompt their own self-discipline and decisions, they will not prevail in the challenges needing manifest strength and example in a kinder and thriftier attitude to the world’s livestock and environment. Two further R’s demand addition: educated Renunciation and Refusal in effectual outrage over chronic cruelties in food production.
 
 
 

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